Fares

Media Statement - Official 2019 Proposed Fare Increase Statement

Below are the comments we presented to the MBTA Fiscal Management Control Board on March 4, 2019:

BOSTON, March 04, 2019 — The MBTA’s proposed 2019 fare increase does not meet any appropriate test for a fair, timely or necessary increase.

The MBTA has sought to justify this increase by pointing to an operating budget deficit. The FY20 deficit is a manufactured one, as the Board has chosen to shift state funding intended for operating costs to the capital account. While performing more repair work is laudable, this cost shifting is made necessary because of the T’s significantly underfunded capital program. If the MBTA’s capital program were fully funded there would be no need to shift operating funds to the capital account. We believe that state funds intended to pay for operating costs should be used for operating expenses, and that the T should develop a comprehensive plan to generate substantial net new revenue that will realistically satisfy its serious capital needs.

Apart from this budget-shifting device, the MBTA adheres to the view that raising fares on a regular two-year cycle is a virtuous discipline. This “eat your peas” approach to revenue generation ignores one important metric that ought to inform any request for a fare increase: performance. We know of few thriving enterprises that raise prices without corresponding performance improvements. While we acknowledge and appreciate the work this board and staff have done to reverse historic trends, performance has not met expectations, and much more must be done before we once again ask riders to bear the burden of a fare increase.

Moreover, fare policy cannot be approached on auto-pilot. Just because the MBTA can raise fares every two years doesn’t mean that it must do so. Decisions such as this ought to be carefully considered within a transparent framework informed by performance metrics and specific policy objectives, including equity, competitiveness and commitment to invest in strategic initiatives like Regional Rail and the Blue/Red connector.

We are convinced that raising fares without the prior commitment of the governor and legislature to raise TNC fees and the gas tax is bad policy. It is more than simply inequitable. It is fundamentally wrong- headed as a business plan as it exacerbates the public subsidy for vehicular travel and pushes more riders away from transit and rail and onto TNCs or private vehicles. This is bad policy, unsustainable and contrary to the Governor’s stated commitment to reducing greenhouse gas emissions.

TransitMatters also supports the other activists and civic leaders who are calling for a fare equity agenda that includes:

  • Ending discussion of distance-based bus and subway fares, which have been shown to be regressive, as more residents are being priced out of housing close to job centers.

  • Rezoning commuter rail fares so that all of Boston is included within Zone 1A and no municipality is split between multiple fare zones.

  • Ensuring that AFC 2.0 fare vending machines are conveniently and strategically located for the maximum convenience of all riders.

Fare policy can no longer be developed and implemented by the MBTA in a vacuum, or without reference to the overarching goal of increasing ridership by moving toward a more equitable, reliable and sustainable system.We understand the challenges and complexities of running a large transit and rail system that suffers from decades of chronic disinvestment.Establishing policies that do not put the transit and rail network at a competitive disadvantage in an era where attractive mobility choices are more plentiful than at any time in history, requires the Secretary, the FMCB and MBTA leadership to rise to the occasion as never before. We hope that they will view this proposed fare increase as ill-advised and ill-timed.


COVERAGE

Media Statement - Proposed 2019 Fare Increase

BOSTON, January 28, 2019 — TransitMatters is disappointed that T officials are proposing an average fare increase of 6.3% to take effect in July, especially given that we are not close to either significantly improved service or the introduction of AFC 2.0.  The healthy skepticism expressed by several members of the Fiscal Management and Control Board ought to carry over to action that holds off on any fare hike until certain specific milestones have been met.

The FMCB should commit the T to certain fare policy changes, such as Zone 1A / Zone 1 equity, Gateway City discounts, and unlimited transfer windows, among other changes, ahead of any fare increase and the introduction of AFC 2.0.  We also think that the current fare increase discussion raises a larger question about the inherent inequity of how transportation modes are treated from the revenue side. Assuming this fare increase goes into effect, subway transit fares will have increased 40 cents since 2014, while the gas tax has remained unchanged (and actually decreased with inflation factored in). Our current approach to raising transportation revenues keeps each element of our mobility system in a silo, exacerbating inequities and encouraging more traffic congestion and modal inequality.  Any T fare increase ought to automatically trigger parallel increases in TNC fees and the gas tax.  That would be fair, sensible and forward-looking. The current approach is an injustice and unsustainable, both economically and environmentally. The Commonwealth’s policy cannot be encouraging people of means to either get into their personal automobile or to worsen congestion by opting for TNCs. For the sake of all our residents, we must start treating our transportation system as one system, and move the revenue levers in tandem. 

Podcast 29 - Transit Advocacy with Rafael Mares from the Conservation Law Foundation

We're joined in studio by prominent Boston transit advocate Rafael Mares, Vice President and Director of Healthy Communities and Environmental Justice for the Conservation Law Foundation. CLF has been instrumental in improving access and mobility for MBTA users, including holding the state to transit project commitments they've tried to wiggle out of.

We discuss the current state of transit operations and investment, the Control Board and politics, the fate of long-awaited projects such the Green Line Extension, the Big Dig legacy, and much more. This episode was recorded on May 16 in the studios of WMBR 88.1 FM in Cambridge, engineered by Scott Mullen.  Find Rafael Mares online at @RafaelMares2 or CLF.

TransitMatters advocates for fast, frequent, reliable and effective public transportation in and around Boston. As part of our vision to repair, upgrade and expand the MBTA transit network, we aim to elevate the conversation around transit issues by offering new perspectives, uniting transit advocates and promoting a level of critical analysis normally absent from other media.

Like what you hear? Share it around, tell your friends and colleagues, and subscribe to the blog and podcast (on iTunes) to be notified of new posts and episodes. Support our work by becoming a member, making a donation or signing up to volunteer because we can't do this alone. Let us know what you think: connect with TransitMatters on Facebook or Twitter. Follow Jeremy Mendelson @Critical Transit, Josh Fairchild @hatchback31, Jarred Johnson @jarjoh, Marc Ebuña @DigitalSciGuy, Scott Mullen @mixmastermully or email us here.

Podcast 25 - Fare Increases, Transfers, Late Night and how to advocate for better transit

"Trust your money to Charlie and save"

The MBTA Control Board voted Monday to raise fares by 10 percent or more despite disruptive protests by community advocates. The extra revenue will be dedicated to infrastructure upgrades, prompting many questions. We'll discuss the bright spots (student pass, transfers, Commuter Rail zone study) and see where we go from here.

Federal regulators object to the elimination of late night service without a proper civil rights analysis and mitigation. What does this mean, and what might mitigation look like?

Boston held a City Council hearing with the T General Manager on Commuter Rail fares, a small step toward realizing our vision for an integrated regional rail network that becomes the preferred travel option. Community feedback and the responses of the GM say a lot about the current state of the Commuter Rail. Look out for an upcoming City Council hearing on transit signal priority for buses and trolleys, and let your councilors know you want better transit.

TransitMatters advocates for fast, frequent, reliable and effective public transportation in and around Boston. As part of our vision to repair, upgrade and expand the MBTA transit network, we aim to elevate the conversation around transit issues by offering new perspectives, uniting transit advocates and promoting a level of critical analysis normally absent from other media.

Like what you hear? Share it around, tell your friends and colleagues, and subscribe to the blog and podcast (on iTunes) to be notified of new posts and episodes. Support our work by becoming a member, making a donation or signing up to volunteer because we can't do this alone. Let us know what you think: connect with TransitMatters on Facebook or Twitter. Follow Jeremy Mendelson @Critical Transit, Josh Fairchild @hatchback31, Jarred Johnson @jarjoh, Marc Ebuña @DigitalSciGuy, or email us here.

Podcast 24 - Rich Davey, Former MBTA GM & Secretary of Transportation

Former MBTA General Manager and MassDOT Secretary, Rich Davey joins us to reflect on his experience and share insight into the current challenges and opportunities facing the T.

Why has the service become so unreliable? Will we ever plan for and implement system upgrades? How can we better use our existing services and resources? Are the labor and management needs being met? How can the T communicate more effectively as well as advocate for itself and the needs of riders? Can we do effective regional planning and forge a working relationship with advocates and cities? How do we raise revenue, and should that be a priority? We finally put to rest the argument over the word annual: whether fares are legally allowed to rise by 5 or 10 percent. And much more.

Prior to running the MBTA, Rich Davey was the General Manager of the Commuter Rail operator. We talk about activating the Fairmount Line and some other ways to improve the Commuter Rail. How might more effective regional planning enable the Commuter Rail to address local and regional transportation challenges?

Transit Matters is a non-profit organization working for fast, frequent, reliable and effective transportation in Boston by elevating the conversation on transportation. By offering new perspectives, uniting transit advocates and promoting a level of critical analysis normally absent from other media, we can achieve a useful and effective transportation network because Transit Matters.

Like what you hear? Share it around, tell your friends and colleagues, and subscribe to the blog and podcast (on iTunes) to be notified of new posts and episodes. Support our work by becoming a member, making a donation or signing up to volunteer because we can't do this alone. Let us know what you think: connect with TransitMatters on Facebook or Twitter. Follow Jeremy Mendelson @Critical Transit, Josh Fairchild @hatchback31, Jarred Johnson @jarjoh, Marc Ebuña @DigitalSciGuy, or email us here.

Fares & Service - Fact Sheet

Print our fact sheet on fares and service quality to arm yourself for fare increase hearings and fight for better service. Speak up at a public meeting, submit comments and contact your representatives. Your city and state elected officials need to hear from you; remind them that the MBTA benefits everyone in the state and we must make up for our past mistakes. Otherwise the death spiral of high fares and poor service will continue -- more breakdown, delays and late trains/buses -- until our once-proud transit network falls apart for good.

Download the fact sheet (PDF) or read the longer version.